Remember the days of blogging?

Were it not for the early bloggers I probably wouldn’t have continued on with building for the web.

I spent just under 3 years working in London around 1999/2000/2001 – the peak of the dotcom boom – and also the managed to catch the end of it. Towards the end of 2001 I left London and moved to Auckland. Needless to say things were running at a MUCH slower pace here than in London. I got a job at a software company mainly building HTML emails.

Things were shit.

I guess boredom at that job led me to read much more online, and this is where I discovered this new Web Standards movement. Mainly reading Jeffery Zeldma’s blog and catching up on a bunch of A List Apart articles…

I eventually left that job and got a much better one at a real web design company. It was around then that I met Amanda, who at the time was a prolific online journaler and blogger (both on Livejournal and her website Vortnex.) Her waxing lyrical about blogging and journaling really pushed me to read more, and in doing so, further fueled my passion for web design and in particular Web Standards. For me this was the peak of blogging – everyone wrote blogs and hosted them themselves. Everyone was learning and writing about what they learnt. 

So, a big shout out to these blogs: zeldman.com, stopdesign.com, mezzoblue.com, molly.comadactio.com, simplebits.com, meyerweb.com, andybudd.com, colly.com, justwatchthesky.com, a.wholelottanothing.org, joshuaink.com, 456bereastreet.com, contentwithstyle.com. Without your writing and teaching in the early 2000’s I wound’t be writing this blog right now.

And this is really what this post is about: writing again, teaching again and hosting my own bloody content again. Spudooli – you’ll be pleased! 

Sitting at Webstock earlier this year listening to Lopp talking about writing reminded me why I love my job and how I learnt my job. So; here’s to more writing, learning & teaching!

And as a bonus, here’s a screenshot of this very website from ~2005.

Dontcom2005@2X
Dontcom Circa April 2005 Darren Wood